Toddler Pajamas from an XL Long Sleeve T: Part the Second: Pants

Here we go with the bottom half of a set of PJ’s. In my opinion, these are even easier than the shirt; certainly they’re less fiddly.

Sleeves, aligned.

Sleeves, aligned. And blurry.

Line up the sleeves of the shirt you hacked up earlier. The seams are on the top of this pic.

Find a pair of pants that fit your kid loosely through the bottom & upper legs. The length doesn’t matter as much, as it is easily changed. Line up the pants on the shirtsleeves, thusly:

Smooth them out where you can.

Smooth them out where you can.

Make sure the pants are folded neatly in half (back-side out), with the seams of the pants lined up with the seams of the sleeves. Pull the crotchular region out into a nice point; just generally try to get the shape of the pants to be as smooth & even as you can. The elastic will bunch the top up, but you should be able to visualize where the fabric would land if that weren’t happening.

The black band at the top is the elastic I used. I wanted to get all the length out of the sleeves as I could, so I put the elastic up at the top to see just how small a seam allowance I could get away with.

Now draw a line, or just cut if you’re braver than I am.

Cut through all 4 layers of fabric, maintaining a quarter-inch seam allowance. These pants will be reversible as-is, if you want a definite front & back just cut out a dip in one side of each leg.

If you have a rotary cutter & mat, just go through everything all at once. (I just got one the other day, and WOW!)

If you have a rotary cutter & mat, just go through everything all at once. (I just got one the other day, and WOW!)

Pin the crotch seam, right sides together, and sew.

Pins are your friends!

Pins are your friends!

Zig-zag wil show, but it beats having to mend ripped seams later.

Zig-zag wil show, but it beats having to mend ripped seams later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measure out some elastic. If your kiddo is handy, wrap it around their waist, otherwise just use the pants as a gauge. Remember to leave some length to sew it together.

Use the elastic to measure the width of your waistband/elastic casing.

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Pin & sew, remembering to leave a gap to thread the elastic into. Grab a large safety pin, and do that, sew the elastic together, and tuck into the waistband. Sew the opening shut.

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The cloth itself will likely not have to stretch to get over your kiddo’s hips, so you can use a straight stitch to sew the waistband, but if you think it might get stretched, use a zig-zag to be on the safe side.

I also like to sew vertically through the finished waistband in 3 or 4 places, to keep the elastic from twisting inside the casing. It doesn’t show much; the gathers hide it.

And they’re done!

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Apparently I forgot a pic of the finished shirt from my last post, so here it is as well.

 

 

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What you don’t see here, is the actual finished shirt. As a pattern, I used a shirt whose fabric was far stretchier than regular cotton t-shirt fabric, so this shirt here was impossible to get on my dear daughter’s little bod. Cursing (under my breath, ha) ensued, and I cut two 2-inch-wide strips of fabric the length of the underarm/side seam, sewed them in, hemmed them, and then put the shirt on her. Muuuch better. Uff da.

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